Project and Programme Failure Rates

Posted by Kevin Brady on Sat 27th June 2009 at 04:20 PM, Filed in Programme ManagementProject ManagementProject /Programme FailuresIndustry News

During a recent trip to the British Library I thought I would take a quick look at the recently published Standish CHAOS Survey to see if we are improving our project and programme delivery failure rates.

I have to say the results of my investigation were very positive:-

Note – In 2000 in the US, the spend on IT application development is approximately $250 billion and represents some 175000 projects. The average cost of a development project for a large company is $2,322,000; for a medium company, it is $1,331,000; and for a a small company, it is $434,000





The survey’s most important conclusions were that recorded project & programme failures occurred for the following reasons:-

• Insufficient board-level support
• Weak leadership
• Unrealistic expectations of the organisational capacity and capability
• Insufficient focus on benefits
• No real picture (blueprint) of the future capability
• Poorly defined or poorly communicated vision
• The organisation fails to change its culture
• Insufficient engagement of stakeholders

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READER COMMENTS:

Excellent cross analysis.

Can we say lack of clarity is the underlying cause?

Posted by Mohan  on Wed 1st July 2009 at 06:02 AM | #

Yeap. That’s it in a nutshell

Posted by Kevin Brady  on Fri 3rd July 2009 at 11:16 PM | #

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